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Brain tumblers don't exist so this is the next best thing.

Dreams and nightmares, hopes and heartaches, mental notes and inspiring quotes, earworms and eye candy. This is probably the closest anyone will get to mapping out the jumbled landscape of my mind.

Current Media
*Reading (Comics): 30 Days of Night: Beyond Barrow

*Reading (Books): Song of the Spiderman

*Playing: Hakuoki: Warriors of the Shinsengumi

*Last Watched: Sympathy for Mr. Vengence

heirofslytherin:

Guess who goes back to school tomorrow?

Not me.

image


hokeyfright:

YOU CAN NEVER SAVE YOUR GAME TOO MANY TIMES. ALWAYS BE SURE TO SAVE YOUR GAME OFTEN. SAVE YOUR GAME BEFORE DOING ANYTHING IMPORTANT. SAVE YOUR GAME AGAIN. THEN SAVE YOUR GAME.


Anonymous said: I get that the "sane" in "safe, sane and consensual" is meant to mean "Don't take advantage of people who are mentally incapable of consent." But is there a less ableist way to say it? Thank you.

fatfeministfetishist:

other-bronte:

pervocracy:

"Risk Aware Consensual Kink" (RACK, because kinksters and our acronyms) is a better way to say it.  "Don’t take advantage of people who can’t consent" is folded into "consensual," and "risk aware" replaces "safe" because safety is always relative—it’s safer to not play at all, but taking informed and controlled risks is ethical.

And actually, I don’t think the “sane” means “don’t take advantage of people”; I think it means “don’t do anything, you know, crazy.”  Things like dedicating yourself as a full-time total slave to someone you met five minutes ago, or using a sledgehammer for impact play, or… something.  But that’s even less okay, because it conflates making terrible decisions with being mentally ill.  (And it’s unhelpful anyway, because people usually can’t judge the quality of their own decisions.)

I think it’s also there as a signal to people outside BDSM not to worry, we may look strange but we’re all quite sane!  Which is definitely ableist, pandering to “normalcy” expectations we’re never going to measure up to anyway, and just plain untrue.

So, yeah.  RACK.

Hell yeah RACK. #acronymfetish

RACK forever, SSC sucks!

honeyed:

rainedragon:

I really want this new print from Belladonna but I’m not sure what cut/color to get. I could coordinate the Navy with red accents as well as cream or green, but most of my navy is more green than the shade of navy that it will be. Red I can coordinate with cream or green, maybe some red. I kinda like the lace on the hem of the JSK more than the pleated ribbon on the hem of the OP… but the JSK needs a blouse. What do you all think? Should I get Wine or Navy? JSK or OP?

Oooh I thought these preorders were sold out for some reason! I really want the JSK in red. I still wish the green version won the vote though!

I didn’t realize these had custom sizing. I wanted it in the black….Maybe I could get it in the red instead…


mszombi:

blackroseponpon:

I got this jsk in May and finally was able to do a decent coord with it~ 

Jsk from AATP, rest is offbrand or made by me

Mega cutie alert


reallyreallyreallytrying:

I can phil it collins in the air tonight, oh lord


darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

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